Stay in School. It’s a Big Deal.

abesenteeism_lp

Between 5 and 7.5 million students are chronically absent in the United States each year. That’s as much as 14 percent of the student population. For low-income and minority students, the rate is often higher – up to 60 percent.

“Addressing the truancy problem isn’t just about getting kids to go to school and fill a seat. It’s about improving their grades, equipping them for their future and getting them to the finish line – graduation,” says Hector Glynn, The Village vice president of programs.

Even with programs in place in place to help stem the problem, like The Village’s Truancy Prevention Project, chronic absenteeism and its complex causes remain a problem, leading to a host of poor outcomes. And the earlier the problem begins, the more negative and long-term the effects can be. Even if attendance improves later, absences in Kindergarten affect math and reading scores in fifth grade.

But parents can provide a first line of defense.

Help us share these messages from young people who tell their stories of absenteeism and encourage parents to stay informed and involved in their children’s education. These videos were developed as part of a project in partnership with the Center for Children’s Advocacy, funded by the Tow Foundation. Share them on Facebook, Twitter, anywhere where parents will see them.